Ancestry Tree Sharing Hint

The other day I tried to share my tree in Ancestry.com with another Ancestry member. I used the Ancestry user name during the Share steps and it did not work. I have shared my tree successfully in the past and so was confused about what was wrong. I sent a note to Customer Services and received a reply within a couple of hours. I decided to share the answer here in case this has stumped others in the past..

Ancestry has both usernames and display names. Some people choose to show their display name in place of a username which appears to be the case here.

In order to share your tree, you’ll need either the username or email address which she can find when she click’s her display name in upper left corner while she’s signed in and share either of those with you so that you can send the invitation.


” Someone’s sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.” – Warren Buffet


End of an Era – National Genographic DNA Project is Going Bye Bye

This announcement appeared on the National Genographic website a couple of days ago.

I took my first “commercial” DNA test with the Genographic Project 1/3/2006 because I trusted National Geographic company!

A few months later I transferred my data to FTDNA and I was hooked! Now they are closing up shop.  I am sad to see them go. They provided raw data downloads and correct haplogroup identifiers, and that migration path my ancestors took that I still prize. They educated lots of folks about what deoxyribonucleic acid (aka DNA) has to do with history. You could say they were pioneers in this genetic genealogy field.

You have until the end of next year 2020 to get all your data from their website.


“A question cannot be answered until it is asked, and once asked, it cannot be unasked.” – Anthony Aguirre


Monthly Meeting – June 6, 2019 – “Genealogical Resources of the California State Library” by Karina Robinson

Join Karina as she takes us on a tour of the California State Library in both Sacramento and San Francisco. She will introduce us to the many collections available both physically on site and on their internet web sites along with the wealth of information available.

Karina Robinson is a Bay Area researcher and genealogist who specializes in the historical content and documentation of the Americas and Europe. She currently serves as special assistant to State Librarian Greg Lucas at the California State Library, where her focus is genealogical research and education. Karina received her B.A. from Mills College in art history and foreign languages (Spanish, German and Italian), earned her M.A. in history from Arizona State University, and has a Certificate in Genealogical Research from Boston University. In addition to researching several hundred family histories, she has contributed scholarship to published monographs, including Dr. Anne Pruitt-Logan’s biography on Dr. Lucy Diggs Slowe, Faithful to the Task at Hand, and scholar Nancy Dallett’s At the Confluence of Change: A History of Tonto National Monument. She has also contributed articles to the online encyclopedia BlackPast.org and has given dozens of presentations throughout Northern California. An avid traveler, Karina has visited and conducted research in libraries and archives around the world.

Doors open at 6:15 pm, the meeting starts at 7:00 pm. We’ll see you at the Family History Center, 1024 Noche Buena, Seaside, CA., left rear of building.


” Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.” – Bill Nye


As long as we remember, they never die!

“Now I’ve heard everything!”. The older one gets, the more often one might say that. Yet the world keeps surprising. This morning I discovered that someone sells gravestone cleaning solution kits!

Don’t get me wrong, I think it is a great idea. They say that solving puzzles causes a dopamine rush which in turn causes addictive behavior. Which, they go on to say, is how genealogy can become addictive! Let me warn you, finding “lost” tombstones can also become addictive.

This picture is known as “The Genealogist Adventure Park.”. A copy of it is hanging in the Monterey Family History Center in Seaside.

This picture is of a genealogist getting a dopamine rush!

And this picture is of a tombstone cleaning kit which is available to buy at Billiongraves.com. Next time you go sleuthing for someone’s grave site and you know it is going to be an old one, perhaps you should carry a bottle of D/2 Biological Solution. Just to honor your ancestor, of course.

40% off Sale Price

The Original

How To Clean

What makes this especially rewarding is that just last night at the MoCoGenSo Board meeting, we discussed creating a “tour a graveyard” excursion for locals in the Monterey County area. If you are interested, contact any Board member. See Board of Directors


“You know you’re a genealogist if you’ve ever had your photo taken in front of a tombstone and you were actually smiling!” — my Quote excel file


Gedmatch has changed their access policies

Gedmatch has made a major adjustment to their polices regarding the access rights Law Enforcement have on their site.  Basically, all kits are now opted NO POLICE ACCESS by default.  If you want to Opt In, that is, allow Law Enforcement to include your kit in it’s match processes, then you need to get onto the GENESIS site and change your options.

I have just finished updating my kits to  allow full rights.  Basically, I reset my kits to be the way it was before this changeI am not going to debate the issue here.  Come to the DNA Sig and we can discuss it fully.  Meanwhile, here are the NEW categories.

Searching with Google

A few years ago I taught a class here about using Google for searching, genealogically speaking. The other days, I ran into a pile of handouts that I had prepared for that class that were not given away. I will drop them off at the FHC for people who are not familiar with Google search syntax items. The syntax has not changed over the years.

I am also including a PDF of that handout here: GOOGLE SYNTAX.

I recently opened a Pro account at Geni.com and was reminded that anyone can search specifically in Geni’s One World Tree using Google for free! Using syntax described in the above file, just do a search that looks like this.  The plus sign restricts it to Geni only.

+site:geni.com “andrew robeson” OR “andy robeson”


“Study predicts more dead Facebook users than living by 2070.” – Oxford Internet Users