Category Archives: Family Search

Free Online Consultations by FamilySearch

Jo Ann Robinson, Director of the local Monterey California Family History Center, reminded us the other day about a service provided by the Salt Lake City Family History Library. Quoting from her:

In these challenging times, the Family History Library in Salt Lake City is making it a bit easier for you to find your ancestors. They are offering free, 20-minute consultations to help you with your personal research questions, using Microsoft Teams for remote meetings.

Click Here to find out how to use this service: FHL WIKI

The Wiki article provides videos about using Microsoft Teams. It is pretty easy. If you are having trouble with a persnickety ancestor, give it a try.

See other ways you can get assistance at the: Family History Guide

Things to do: Indexing

Some folks have a bit more spare time these days. Things that have been put off are getting done! That is good news, even if we complain about current events. But there are only so many weeds to pull, only so many socks to knit, only one fence to repair, only so many miles to walk. Some who love to volunteer in the public sector are suddenly missing their need for an altruistic fix.

Here is an idea…. there are still old genealogical records out there that need indexing!

If you have a few hours to spare and the T-V is turning into a radio and your family tree is filled out through six generations of cousins, then maybe you could volunteer as an indexer at either FamilySearch.org or Ancestry.com.

As they say, from the comfort of your own home…. all you need is a computer connected to the internet. You can even choose projects that you prefer, like in Wisconsin, Italy, Guatamala, Georgia, etc. I would like it if some of you who can read German records would help index some of my family’s records! 🙂

Here is a link to the top of FamilySearch indexing project:

FamilySearch Indexing

They also have a need to index records at Ancestry.com.

Ancestry Indexing

Of course, you could start your own blog. That could be my next Things ToDo article ?


”My wife keeps reminding me about some things that need repair around the house. One would think that after six months she’d know I have the list memorized.”


Uploading Gedcoms into FamilySearch

The following information has not been tested by me. But, as a volunteer at the Monterey Family History Center, the question about uploading gedcom files into FamilySearch.org comes up once in a while. I never know how to answer, some of my coworkers say Yes, some say No. In a message site the other day, the subject came up and a couple of links were posted as well as some advice. I have decided to share this information here (before I forget where I saw it!)

Kitty Cooper wrote about this subject 6 years ago, and updated it last year. See here:

How to add a GEDCOM to familysearch.org

Family Search themselves wrote about this subject. Here is the real story:

https://www.familysearch.org/help/salesforce/viewArticle?urlname=Uploading-GEDCOM-Files-and-Copying-the-Information-to-Family-Tree&lang=en

Tim Janzen gave me this wise counsel on the message board:

This is probably best done by people who have ancestries that are not currently very well represented in the FS Family Tree. I think that for most people the best thing to do is to find their grandparents or great grandparents in the tree and then add the genealogical data one fact at a time. I am frequently correcting errors in the tree made by people who uploaded GEDCOMs into the tree and did so in a very sloppy manner resulting in unnecessary duplicates that “cleaners” like me have to merge and get rid of after doing some careful research about the situation.

In any case, the FS Family Tree is a wonderful tool for genetic genealogists. If FamilySearch ever starts integrating genetic data into the tree it will be even more wonderful than it currently is. I learned at RootsTech that about 16 million new people are being added to the tree each month.


”The Internet is making smart people smarter and dumb people dumber.” – Kevin Drum