Category Archives: DNA

DNA Discusssion – Wednesday April 1 – 12:00 noon

Our virtual DNA Discussions meeting for April 1st will include discussions about special bloggers who I find very helpful in the field of DNA and genealogy; and I will show some examples of finding cousins in your Ancestry Thrulines system. Thrulines can be very helpful when there is only one unknown person between your tree and the match.

Topic: MoCoGenSo’s DNA Discussion Meeting

Time: Wednesday Apr 1, 2020 12:00 Noon Pacific Time

Join Zoom Meeting here:
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/343488091

Meeting ID: 343 488 091


Virtual Meetings – first up: DNA Discussions

MoCoGenSo is going to try holding online meetings using an application called ZOOM. We will begin our experiment with the DNA Discussion group. Zoom is a video conferencing system that allows online real-time virtual meetings to be held with from 2 to 100 participants. If this first test works well, we will expand our virtual meeting menu for other meetings. The future is ours to make!

Setup:
Zoom will run on phone, tablets (iPads, etc), and/or laptop/desktop computers. Depending on which device you plan to use, your instructions are a bit different.  But for ALL devices, you will need to download and install the ZOOM application first – it’s FREE. If you plan to use a phone, your video will be very small but it still works fine. If you have a choice about which hardware to use, opt for the larger screen because you can see more! Once in the meeting, you can play with the video/audio options to see what works best for you.

Tablets/phones:
Go to your APP store and get the ZOOM Cloud Meetings app and install it. Once installed, you are ready to go when the meeting time comes around.

Desktop/Laptop Computers:
In your browser, go to www.zoom.us . In the upper right corner, click on RESOURCES, then click on DOWNLOAD ZOOM CLIENT FOR MEETINGS. The client will download into your DOWNLOAD folder. Go to that folder and just double click on the file called “zoominstaller.exe” and Zoom will automatically install onto your computer.

Joining the Meeting:
Once Zoom is installed you are ready to go. You do not have to create a Zoom account to join a meeting. You just have to have the software previously installed. On the day of the meeting, we will post a link here that you will just have to click on to join the meeting! This is the experimental part of this, we’ve never posted a link for public access before.  You will have to enter your name before joining — everyone in the meeting can see your name.  Be sure to agree to video and audio.

You should be able to see and hear each other. A presenter can display their desktop so we can show action just as if we were watching the screen during an in-person meeting. You can enable/disable video while in the meeting. You can also change video to “gallery” mode to see all of us at once or you can set it to “speaker” mode to see only the current speaker.

If anyone has trouble installing the software or connecting to the meeting, you can call me separately and I’ll see if I can help to get you in.

Go ahead, install Zoom and join us for our first “experimental” virtual DNA Discussion group on Wednesday April 1st at 12:00 noon. Like all MoCoGenSo meetings, they are open to all, you do not have to be a member to attend.

By the way, Zoom can be used for free to connect your family members too. Try it!


I will run a test or two before next Wednesday. If you have Zoom installed and are a follower here and receive a post with a scheduled meeting link, feel free to join in. We need to test this, after all.


DNA Discussion Group Meets on Wednesday March 4 at Noon

Rootstech 2020 is over, and lots of folks are now deep into researching their family again. Many people, perhaps some of your cousins, have purchased DNA test kits and are now, as we speak, spitting or swabbing. In a few weeks, there will be a rash of new matches appearing at the various sits. Will we be ready?

There were three streaming sessions at Rootstech about DNA. Junel Davidson is going to lead discussions about new findings and features.

Angie Bush talked about adding to your tree using DNA. Blaine Bettinger discussed DNA and the law! Robin Wirthlin taked about emotional family side of DNA. There was more of course.

I hope someone talks about the new Mitochondrial project called Million Mito. It will be attempting to trace the family tree of “womankind”! That sounds exciting, Both my wife and I want to find out how to participate.

Remember, this is a DNA discussion group for all levels. Come join the crowd.

”Like anything else, to get results, you have to feed the machine. Computers do their best work with more, rather than less, information.” – Roberta Estes


Ancestry.com lays off 6% of its workforce

Ancestry, the largest seller of at-home DNA tests for health and genealogy reports, is laying off about 100 people, approximately 6% of its total workforce. The cuts hit employees across the board, rather than focusing on a specific department, and included workers at all levels. The layoffs affected both its Utah and California offices.

Ancestry confirmed the layoffs and shared a copy of a blog post written by CEO and President Margo Georgiadis that will publish on Wednesday.

——

We just discussed 23andMe laying of 100 employees (14%) of it’s employees at our DNA discussion group today. Then this appears in my news feed. It is like “catching”, I guess.

Interesting Stats:

23andMe, 100 = 14% of 714 employees, leaving 614.

Ancestry, 100 = 6% of 1,666 employees, leaving 1,566.

—–

Who is next?


“Genealogist’s motto: they can hide, but they can’t run.”


DNA Discusssions – Feb 5, 2020

23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki (pronounced “Woh-JIS-key”) announced last week that the company is laying off 14% of its staff amid an industry-wide decline in sales of consumer DNA tests that has driven several companies in the industry toward other endeavors.

23andMe, like FTDNA, do not charge an annual “maintenance” fee. Ancestry and MyHeritage do charge big annuals fees. Given that the Pentagon has come out against at-home DNA testing (could it be that people in high places have something to hide?) and given that ethnicity reports haven’t been all that accurate, what does the future hold for those of us who have already tested? Tune in next week for the rest of the story. 🙂

Meanwhile, our very own DNA Discussion group had already decided to concentrate on 23andMe during the next session. Join us Wednesday, February 5th as Terry Jackson shares some of his experiences at 23andMe.

If you have tested with 23andMe or are considering it, we meet at 12 noon at the FHC in the Library. We would like to hear from you, too.


” The Internet is making smart people smarter and dumb people dumber.” – Kevin Drum


Upload your DNA data to MyHeritage for FREE for the next few days.

Sorry I am late posting this, but…

MyHeritage has a great deal going whereby you can upload DNA data files for whomever and not have to pay the normal $29 fee to process the file and get into the DNA Matching system! This deal lasts for a few more days, until midnight of December 18, 2019.

These days there are many people who have tested their DNA and are looking for a safe, free, and law-enforcement-free service where they can upload their DNA data and receive DNA matches. Now is the time to do it!!

Please go to their blog here for more information. MH BLOG

Gotta go now, I am going to go upload a data set for my sister-in-law now!


”Ancestry.com went down today, so I spent some time with family. They seem like nice people.”


Genealogy with DNA Discussion Group Meets on Wednesday Dec 4 at Noon

if you plan to do research at your FHC, bring a thumbdrive!

IMPUTE: assign a value to something by inference from the value of the products or processes to which it contributes.

IMPUTATION in Genetics: using statistical inference to deduce unknown genotypes based on known ones. Genotype imputation is usually performed on SNPs, the most common kind of genetic variation.

IMPUTATION is the process whereby your DNA is tested and then the results “expanded” by inferring results for additional locations, meaning locations that haven’t been tested, by using information from results you do have. In other words, the DNA is adjacent locations is predicted, or imputed, by their association with their traveling companions. In DNA, traveling companions are often known to travel together, but not always. From DNAeXplained.

How does this relate to me? Some DNA testing companies allow you to upload your DNA DATA file generated at another company. For example, Family Tree DNA will accept DATA files from 23andMe as input to their Family Finder product. The price for this service is lower than if you took the “spit test” obviously because they do not have to mail kits and do the processing required to sequence the DNA.

But, there is a “gotcha” here. The different companies do not all use the same chips nor sample the same SNP locations. They also upgrade their own chips periodically. To be able to be backward compatible and to provide MATCHING services, they need to “equalize” the data enough so they will be reasonably accurate. This is fine except when chromosome browsers are used to compare segments.

My view is to remember your purpose. If you are after accuracy above all else, then spend the extra money to get the “spit test”. But if you just want to broaden your cousin match pool, by all means try uploading your data somewhere else at the discounted pricing.

An example of how we used data uploads. Sisters A & B had tested at FTDNA. Sister C had tested at 23andMe. In order to get all 3 sisters together, we downloaded sister C data from 23andMe and then uploaded it into FTDNA for only $19.

AncestryDNA and 23andMe do NOT accept DNA data uploads, the other companies do. I recommend testing at one of these companies, downloading the data and uploading elsewhere. Unless, like me, you want purity everywhere. 🙂

Let’s discuss it.


”I hate when people accuse me of lolly gagging when I’m quite clearly dilly dallying.” – Rebelsmarket