Category Archives: DNA

Ancestry.com lays off 6% of its workforce

Ancestry, the largest seller of at-home DNA tests for health and genealogy reports, is laying off about 100 people, approximately 6% of its total workforce. The cuts hit employees across the board, rather than focusing on a specific department, and included workers at all levels. The layoffs affected both its Utah and California offices.

Ancestry confirmed the layoffs and shared a copy of a blog post written by CEO and President Margo Georgiadis that will publish on Wednesday.

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We just discussed 23andMe laying of 100 employees (14%) of it’s employees at our DNA discussion group today. Then this appears in my news feed. It is like “catching”, I guess.

Interesting Stats:

23andMe, 100 = 14% of 714 employees, leaving 614.

Ancestry, 100 = 6% of 1,666 employees, leaving 1,566.

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Who is next?


“Genealogist’s motto: they can hide, but they can’t run.”


DNA Discusssions – Feb 5, 2020

23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki (pronounced “Woh-JIS-key”) announced last week that the company is laying off 14% of its staff amid an industry-wide decline in sales of consumer DNA tests that has driven several companies in the industry toward other endeavors.

23andMe, like FTDNA, do not charge an annual “maintenance” fee. Ancestry and MyHeritage do charge big annuals fees. Given that the Pentagon has come out against at-home DNA testing (could it be that people in high places have something to hide?) and given that ethnicity reports haven’t been all that accurate, what does the future hold for those of us who have already tested? Tune in next week for the rest of the story. 🙂

Meanwhile, our very own DNA Discussion group had already decided to concentrate on 23andMe during the next session. Join us Wednesday, February 5th as Terry Jackson shares some of his experiences at 23andMe.

If you have tested with 23andMe or are considering it, we meet at 12 noon at the FHC in the Library. We would like to hear from you, too.


” The Internet is making smart people smarter and dumb people dumber.” – Kevin Drum


Upload your DNA data to MyHeritage for FREE for the next few days.

Sorry I am late posting this, but…

MyHeritage has a great deal going whereby you can upload DNA data files for whomever and not have to pay the normal $29 fee to process the file and get into the DNA Matching system! This deal lasts for a few more days, until midnight of December 18, 2019.

These days there are many people who have tested their DNA and are looking for a safe, free, and law-enforcement-free service where they can upload their DNA data and receive DNA matches. Now is the time to do it!!

Please go to their blog here for more information. MH BLOG

Gotta go now, I am going to go upload a data set for my sister-in-law now!


”Ancestry.com went down today, so I spent some time with family. They seem like nice people.”


Genealogy with DNA Discussion Group Meets on Wednesday Dec 4 at Noon

if you plan to do research at your FHC, bring a thumbdrive!

IMPUTE: assign a value to something by inference from the value of the products or processes to which it contributes.

IMPUTATION in Genetics: using statistical inference to deduce unknown genotypes based on known ones. Genotype imputation is usually performed on SNPs, the most common kind of genetic variation.

IMPUTATION is the process whereby your DNA is tested and then the results “expanded” by inferring results for additional locations, meaning locations that haven’t been tested, by using information from results you do have. In other words, the DNA is adjacent locations is predicted, or imputed, by their association with their traveling companions. In DNA, traveling companions are often known to travel together, but not always. From DNAeXplained.

How does this relate to me? Some DNA testing companies allow you to upload your DNA DATA file generated at another company. For example, Family Tree DNA will accept DATA files from 23andMe as input to their Family Finder product. The price for this service is lower than if you took the “spit test” obviously because they do not have to mail kits and do the processing required to sequence the DNA.

But, there is a “gotcha” here. The different companies do not all use the same chips nor sample the same SNP locations. They also upgrade their own chips periodically. To be able to be backward compatible and to provide MATCHING services, they need to “equalize” the data enough so they will be reasonably accurate. This is fine except when chromosome browsers are used to compare segments.

My view is to remember your purpose. If you are after accuracy above all else, then spend the extra money to get the “spit test”. But if you just want to broaden your cousin match pool, by all means try uploading your data somewhere else at the discounted pricing.

An example of how we used data uploads. Sisters A & B had tested at FTDNA. Sister C had tested at 23andMe. In order to get all 3 sisters together, we downloaded sister C data from 23andMe and then uploaded it into FTDNA for only $19.

AncestryDNA and 23andMe do NOT accept DNA data uploads, the other companies do. I recommend testing at one of these companies, downloading the data and uploading elsewhere. Unless, like me, you want purity everywhere. 🙂

Let’s discuss it.


”I hate when people accuse me of lolly gagging when I’m quite clearly dilly dallying.” – Rebelsmarket


DNA Discussions Survey – Nov 2019

At the last meeting of the DNA Sig, we took a poll. This was a not statistically significant poll, but it was written and in person. The poll just surveyed what Genealogy & DNA company people actually were using. The list was limited to the items on the poll. There are other DNA companies out there, but they were not on the list.

This group,had Ancestry tree highest, but AncestryDNA and FTDNA were equal! We will repeat this little survey again.

Native American DNA and Ethnicity

Junel Davidsen gave a really interesting talk during our November 2019 monthly meeting about Native American DNA! It was interesting even for “non-natives”. 🙂  She gave history and presented data from her own ancestry and DNA results.

We have here the handout containing resources and links that Junel provided at the meeting. The file is a PDF with “live” links. It is full of links that will interest both DNA hunters and Native American Genealogy researchers. Download and enjoy.

Native American DNA Links

Genealogy with DNA Discussion Group to Meet on 1st Wednesdays

MoCoGenSo, in cooperation with the FHC, is going to form a new “discussion” group to explore genealogy and the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) therein.

We are going to have our meetings discussion oriented, talking about using DNA to enhance our genealogical efforts. Our goal is to help each other learn.

The big deal about this restructuring is the scheduling: we are going to meet on the ”1st Wednesday of the month at 12 noon.


We will hold our first meeting November 6th in the Film room at the FHC. We will provide the large display monitor for computer screens when needed to enhance discussions. I will bring my laptop, you can bring yours. iPads work if you have the right adapter.

I have decided to monitor this group because I myself really do want to learn more. If we provide the forum, perhaps others will share too. We will open the door and see who comes in!


” Fix your eyes forward on what you can do, not back on what you cannot change.” – Tom Clancy