Category Archives: 23AndMe

Regarding These Sales

Personal views follow…

We advocate doing DNA tests for genealogical purposes.  DNA testing is not required to do excellent genealogical work, but it can help break some roadblocks or just help discover new cousins that have those long lost pictures!

But testing at just one company is like only fishing in just one pond.  Some of your relatives might pick a different sale this month, for example.  So I always recommend that you test at each of the “big 4”:  AncestryDNA, 23andMe, MyHeritage and Family Tree DNA.

That can get expensive!  That is why we always mention sales around here.

Picking which place to test is a subject best suited for our DNA Discussion Group.  But it is important that you remember that AncestryDNA and 23andMe do NOT accept data file uploads while MyHeritage and Family Tree DNA DO accept DNA data uploads at a considerable discount in price.  Perhaps testing at AncestryDNA or 23andMe first might be a good idea for some.


” L.O.C.K.S.S. ===> Lots of copies keep stuff safe.


Big Sale

Discover your family tree with a $99 DNA test from 23andMe

Black Friday must be coming, because 23andMe‘s Health and Ancestry test is half off again.  For $99, you get both Ancestry and Health.  Maybe now is the time to splurge. Thru Nov 26th.

 

Refreshing the 23andMe Tree

23andMe builds a nice tree using DNA matches which can be augmented yourself with people who have not tested. The tree is usually small, and, except for your additions and the recently deceased, only has living people. The tree is fun, since it is DNA driven! There are issues with it which we have discussed in our DNA SIG meetings, but most people like it.

Kitty Cooper writes a great blog about “genealogy, genetics and gardening”. Kitty Cooper is an American bridge player and genetic genealogist from New York City. I enjoy her posts and her blog has a permanent place in my Feedly sites. See her blog CLICK HERE .

She just wrote another posting about the 23andMe tree! Most of the post is interesting personal views, but the thing that caught my eye was the part about recalculating the tree. 23andMe doesn’t include a simple push-button method of refreshing the tree, Kitty shows how to do it!

See the whole posting here: CLICK HERE.

Be sure to save a picture of the tree with your additions before you try this! 😊


“It’ll all work out in the end; if it isn’t worked out, it ain’t the end.” – Betsy Johnson


23andMe Family Tree is now accepting editing!

If you haven’t looked, 23andMe now has Editing available in its Family Tree! One of our DNA Discussions group (thanks Gail) sent me a note about it. Sure enough, when you click on a circle in the Tree, two new options appear: Edit Relationship and Add Relatives. Be careful, I haven’t found a how-to guide going in yet, but there seems to be decent explanations as you go. The Tree is no longer marked Beta!

The tree algorithms have been changed too. The chart and cousin relationships are more accurate! But watch it, an old line of cousins disappeared which was an accurate line. Not sure why, but I’m going to try to add them back with the new tools.

One set of my maternal great grandparents were quite prolific, having had twelve kids who followed their parents habits — making for four lines coming from them in the new tree. Add to that the missing line and I have five cousins to try to determine their lineage coming from that one family. I put them into the chromosome mapper found in the Advanced DNA Comparison. Sure enough, the various lines “sorta” get defined within the chromosome map. Combining the two tools is useful. When mapping, I started out comparing to myself, then I deleted me and the patterns worked better.

Remember to send notes to cousins you can’t quite place. Some of them will help out. Be sure you reply too. 🙂

I really like this 23andMe site. It has the tools we need! Couple that with the tree building functions in Ancestry.com and my computer in one hand and my iPad in the other and I am set to get through this pandemic without even noticing! But, the wife says I gotta exercise more than my fingers….


I received a reply from the cousin whose line is missing in my current Tree. I show up in his. Go figure…


“You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today. And then one day you find ten years have got behind you. No one told you when to run…” – Pink Floyd


Ancestry.com lays off 6% of its workforce

Ancestry, the largest seller of at-home DNA tests for health and genealogy reports, is laying off about 100 people, approximately 6% of its total workforce. The cuts hit employees across the board, rather than focusing on a specific department, and included workers at all levels. The layoffs affected both its Utah and California offices.

Ancestry confirmed the layoffs and shared a copy of a blog post written by CEO and President Margo Georgiadis that will publish on Wednesday.

——

We just discussed 23andMe laying of 100 employees (14%) of it’s employees at our DNA discussion group today. Then this appears in my news feed. It is like “catching”, I guess.

Interesting Stats:

23andMe, 100 = 14% of 714 employees, leaving 614.

Ancestry, 100 = 6% of 1,666 employees, leaving 1,566.

—–

Who is next?


“Genealogist’s motto: they can hide, but they can’t run.”


DNA Discusssions – Feb 5, 2020

23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki (pronounced “Woh-JIS-key”) announced last week that the company is laying off 14% of its staff amid an industry-wide decline in sales of consumer DNA tests that has driven several companies in the industry toward other endeavors.

23andMe, like FTDNA, do not charge an annual “maintenance” fee. Ancestry and MyHeritage do charge big annuals fees. Given that the Pentagon has come out against at-home DNA testing (could it be that people in high places have something to hide?) and given that ethnicity reports haven’t been all that accurate, what does the future hold for those of us who have already tested? Tune in next week for the rest of the story. 🙂

Meanwhile, our very own DNA Discussion group had already decided to concentrate on 23andMe during the next session. Join us Wednesday, February 5th as Terry Jackson shares some of his experiences at 23andMe.

If you have tested with 23andMe or are considering it, we meet at 12 noon at the FHC in the Library. We would like to hear from you, too.


” The Internet is making smart people smarter and dumb people dumber.” – Kevin Drum


23AndMe Tree

News about the new tree is starting to come out.

In order to utilize the new tree feature, you must enable Beta for your account, which you can find under your name in the Settings area.

Be sure to go to the dna-explained.com blog to see Roberta Estes’ thoughts on the tree.

https://dna-explained.com/2019/09/26/23andme-automatically-creates-tree-using-new-technology-relationship-triangulation/

Adoptees must think they’ve died and gone to the happy hereafter, because all other vendors’ tree support requires you to actually HAVE a tree of some description. Of course, adoptees and people seeking an unknown parent don’t have trees for their unknown parents.

The following was written by 23AndMe themselves.

https://customercare.23andme.com/hc/en-us/articles/360036068393-The-23andMe-Family-Tree-Feature

“Your family tree is written in your DNA, and 23andMe researchers have developed an algorithm that can help you read it.

“Instead of relying on customers to painstakingly enter names and dates — or tracking down records — just to get started, 23andMe new Family Tree does it for you using your genetic connections and DNA Relatives.

“With the click of a button, your genetic family tree is built automatically by an algorithm that predicts relationships based the DNA shared between you and your DNA Relatives. The size of your family tree depends on how many connections and DNA Relatives you have close relationships with in the 23andMe database. Participating in 23andMe’s DNA Relatives tool helps improve the experience. Customers will also be able to add names of relatives, or ancestors, to the family tree whether or not those individuals are on 23andMe. As the 23andMe database grows, customers may see their trees expand.

“We created this new feature because we heard from customers who want to understand their recent family history, but don’t want the hassle of building a traditional family tree from scratch. The team is also working on additional functionality, such as the ability to edit your predicted relationships, which is expected to roll out in the coming weeks. 23andMe’s Family Tree offers a simple friction-free option, and a beautiful way to visualize how you connect with DNA Relatives.”

New 23AndMe Predicted Tree

23AndMe is at it again! They are experimenting with a Tree built from your DNA matches! They are calling it your “predicted tree”. It is similar in purpose to Ancestry’s Thrulines and MyHeritage’s Theory of Family Relativity but it is using those 23AndMe cousins who have been really hard to trace.

I just discovered it today… it hasn’t been discussed yet anywhere and doesn’t even have a real name yet.

Finding this new tool is easy in the IOS App, just move down the home page to where the icon to the tree appears, and click on it.

In the PC site, go to the “Ancestry” section, then go all the way to the bottom of the page and find “Family Tree Beta” in the right of the footer section. Or go to the “Family” section and pick the “Family Tree Beta”.

You should really check this out. It is great. This is the first DNA only tree I have seen. It only goes back 5 generations, and perhaps it limits display to those matching greater than X centimorgans.  We’ll find out details in the future.  Meanwhile,  I figure that the more people who use it, the more likely they are to keep it! Here is a snip from my predicted tree. Note the two cousins names next to my picture:

Perhaps we can explore this new tool at the first meeting of the Genealogy & DNA Discussion Group 🙂


”Never doubt the courage of the French. They were the ones that discovered that snails are edible.”


number of SNPs tested by chip

I am testing the process of creating a Post here via Email. If it works well, perhaps we can get other folks to create postings too. This particular post might come or go rather quickly, so be-aware!

On a more serious note, I am going to create a table showing the number of SNPs tested by chip for the different testing companies. I was hoping to find what I wanted online somewhere, but alas, I will create one myself using these links.

ALL

https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_testing_comparison_chart

23andme

http://www.rootsandrecombinantdna.com/2018/01/23andme-chip-versions-comparison.html

https://isogg.org/wiki/23andMe#Chip_versions

AncestryDNA

https://isogg.org/wiki/AncestryDNA#Chip_versions

https://dna-explained.com/2016/10/05/ancestry-v1-vs-v2-test-comparison/

MyHeritage

https://blog.myheritage.com/2019/04/update-regarding-dna-test-processing-times/

Genographic

https://dna-explained.com/2016/10/05/ancestry-v1-vs-v2-test-comparison/

FTDNA

https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/autosomal-ancestry/universal-dna-matching/data-points/