Category Archives: 2019

Genealogy with DNA Discussion Group Meets on Wednesday Dec 4 at Noon

if you plan to do research at your FHC, bring a thumbdrive!

IMPUTE: assign a value to something by inference from the value of the products or processes to which it contributes.

IMPUTATION in Genetics: using statistical inference to deduce unknown genotypes based on known ones. Genotype imputation is usually performed on SNPs, the most common kind of genetic variation.

IMPUTATION is the process whereby your DNA is tested and then the results “expanded” by inferring results for additional locations, meaning locations that haven’t been tested, by using information from results you do have. In other words, the DNA is adjacent locations is predicted, or imputed, by their association with their traveling companions. In DNA, traveling companions are often known to travel together, but not always. From DNAeXplained.

How does this relate to me? Some DNA testing companies allow you to upload your DNA DATA file generated at another company. For example, Family Tree DNA will accept DATA files from 23andMe as input to their Family Finder product. The price for this service is lower than if you took the “spit test” obviously because they do not have to mail kits and do the processing required to sequence the DNA.

But, there is a “gotcha” here. The different companies do not all use the same chips nor sample the same SNP locations. They also upgrade their own chips periodically. To be able to be backward compatible and to provide MATCHING services, they need to “equalize” the data enough so they will be reasonably accurate. This is fine except when chromosome browsers are used to compare segments.

My view is to remember your purpose. If you are after accuracy above all else, then spend the extra money to get the “spit test”. But if you just want to broaden your cousin match pool, by all means try uploading your data somewhere else at the discounted pricing.

An example of how we used data uploads. Sisters A & B had tested at FTDNA. Sister C had tested at 23andMe. In order to get all 3 sisters together, we downloaded sister C data from 23andMe and then uploaded it into FTDNA for only $19.

AncestryDNA and 23andMe do NOT accept DNA data uploads, the other companies do. I recommend testing at one of these companies, downloading the data and uploading elsewhere. Unless, like me, you want purity everywhere. 🙂

Let’s discuss it.


”I hate when people accuse me of lolly gagging when I’m quite clearly dilly dallying.” – Rebelsmarket


Native American DNA and Ethnicity

Junel Davidsen gave a really interesting talk during our November 2019 monthly meeting about Native American DNA! It was interesting even for “non-natives”. 🙂  She gave history and presented data from her own ancestry and DNA results.

We have here the handout containing resources and links that Junel provided at the meeting. The file is a PDF with “live” links. It is full of links that will interest both DNA hunters and Native American Genealogy researchers. Download and enjoy.

Native American DNA Links

Monthly Meeting – August 1, 2019 – “Brick Walls in My Genealogy? How Did They Get There?” by Shelley McFadden

At some point, every family historian encounters a barrier in their genealogy research. In genealogy, these barriers are known as “Brick Walls” and they can often appear impossible to work around. We must remember Genealogy is a research field concerned primarily with accurately reconstructing forgotten, unknown or hidden identities, relationships, activities of families, individuals, and more. It borrows from fields like anthropology, economics, genetics, history, law, mathematics, and sociology. Many pursue family history for pleasure and to learn more about their family ’s background, while most family historians, consider accurate results important. Genealogy is “Problem-Solving” – not a straightforward primary information with direct evidence. We will learn 16 reasons why we create brick walls in our Family Genealogy, and a disciplined approach to solving them.

Shelley McFadden holds a BFA in Fine Arts at the University of Hawaii and is a retired RN from CHOMP. She has worked for over 40 years on her family genealogy. Her focus Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina, New York, Ohio, and New England. She has served as a past President for Monterey County Genealogy Society, and is currently serving as 1st Vice President-Programs Chair. She is a member of Commodore Sloat Chapter, and associate member of Aloha Chapter of the DAR. A Charter member of the Colonial Dames in Hawaii. She specializes in Newspaper Research.

Doors open at 6:15 pm, the meeting starts at 7:00 pm. We’ll see you at the Family History Center, 1024 Noche Buena, Seaside, CA., left rear of building.


“For the oldest man in the world, everyone that existed on the entire planet when he was born are now dead.” – Reddit


Ancestry DNA Circles going going gone by July 1

We only have 4 more days to preserve their contents.

Roberta Estes of the wonderful DNAeXplained blog has reminded us that DNA Circles are soon going to be a thing of the past.

This is reminder that Ancestry is permanently removing DNA Circles from customer accounts on July 1st. If you have not recorded the information held in your Circles and New Ancestor Discoveries, if you had any, do that NOW.

Circles provide you with information about people who match you that share a common ancestor, but they ALSO show you who else has tested and matches the people you match, but not you. That’s valuable information for numerous reasons. It verifies multiple children of that ancestor genetically and provides you with a genetic network to validate the ancestral connection for all of those people..

See her full posting here: DNAeXplained


” The hard part of standing on an exponential curve is: when you look backwards, it looks flat, and when you look forward, it looks vertical. And it’s very hard to calibrate how much you are moving because it always looks the same.” – Sam Altman


Monthly Meeting – June 6, 2019 – “Genealogical Resources of the California State Library” by Karina Robinson

Join Karina as she takes us on a tour of the California State Library in both Sacramento and San Francisco. She will introduce us to the many collections available both physically on site and on their internet web sites along with the wealth of information available.

Karina Robinson is a Bay Area researcher and genealogist who specializes in the historical content and documentation of the Americas and Europe. She currently serves as special assistant to State Librarian Greg Lucas at the California State Library, where her focus is genealogical research and education. Karina received her B.A. from Mills College in art history and foreign languages (Spanish, German and Italian), earned her M.A. in history from Arizona State University, and has a Certificate in Genealogical Research from Boston University. In addition to researching several hundred family histories, she has contributed scholarship to published monographs, including Dr. Anne Pruitt-Logan’s biography on Dr. Lucy Diggs Slowe, Faithful to the Task at Hand, and scholar Nancy Dallett’s At the Confluence of Change: A History of Tonto National Monument. She has also contributed articles to the online encyclopedia BlackPast.org and has given dozens of presentations throughout Northern California. An avid traveler, Karina has visited and conducted research in libraries and archives around the world.

Doors open at 6:15 pm, the meeting starts at 7:00 pm. We’ll see you at the Family History Center, 1024 Noche Buena, Seaside, CA., left rear of building.


” Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.” – Bill Nye